Category Archives: Realtor

Understanding Agency Relationships

The term “agency” is used in real estate to help determine what legal responsibilities your real estate professional owes to you and other parties in the transaction.

The seller’s representative (also known as a listing agent or seller’s agent) is hired by and represents the seller. All fiduciary duties are owed to the seller, meaning this person’s job is to get the best price and terms for the seller. The agency relationship usually is created by a signed listing contract.

The buyer’s representative (also known as a buyer’s agent) is hired by prospective buyers to and works in the buyer’s best interest throughout the transaction. The buyer can pay the agent directly through a negotiated fee, or the buyer’s rep may be paid by the seller or through a commission split with the seller’s agent.

A subagent owes the same fiduciary duties to the agent’s customer as the agent does. Subagency usually arises when a cooperating sales associate from another brokerage, who is not the buyer’s agent, shows property to a buyer. The subagent works with the buyer to show the property but owes fiduciary duties to the listing broker and the seller. Although a subagent cannot assist the buyer in any way that would be detrimental to the seller, a buyer customer can expect to be treated honestly by the subagent.

A disclosed dual agent represents both the buyer and the seller in the same real estate transaction. In such relationships, dual agents owe limited fiduciary duties to both buyer and seller clients. Because of the potential for conflicts of interest in a dual-agency relationship, all parties must give their informed consent. Disclosed dual agency is legal in most states, but often requires written consent from all parties.

Designated agents (also called appointed agents) are chosen by a managing broker to act as an exclusive agent of the seller or buyer. This allows the brokerage to avoid problems arising from dual-agency relationships for licensees at the brokerage. The designated agents give their clients full representation, with all of the attendant fiduciary duties.

A transaction broker (sometimes referred to as a facilitator) is permitted in states where nonagency relationships are allowed. These relationships vary considerably from state to state. Generally, the duties owed to the consumer in a nonagency relationship are less than the complete, traditional fiduciary duties of an agency relationship.

Source: National Association of REALTORS®

Real Estate Career Opportunity

The real estate industry lost a number of real estate professionals in past years  because there were not enough sales to support them. Many have remained in the business, but on a part time basis. They’ve been forced to take another job just to make ends meet.  As the market continues to improve, many of these folks will return to the business full time.

If you are considering a career in real estate or returning to the business, then check us out at www.TopofKnox.com.

6 Home Buying Tips

These tips came from a survey of 400 real estate professionals. These items are listed in order of importance, from most to least.

  1. Get a home inspection to evaluate the safety and overall condition of the home
  2. Before you start your house hunting, get pre-approved for a mortgage
  3. Direct all communications with the seller through your real estate agent
  4. Get all agreements with the seller in writing
  5. Include important contingences in your offer, such as, financing and inspections
  6. Come up with realistic expections for a house based upon your budget

Source: Market Leader.com

REALTORS® Code of Ethics

The REALTORS®’ Code of Ethics was established in 1913 by the National Association of REALTORS®. It’s a set of rules that were established to raise the standards of professionalism and service in the real estate industry. The rules are divided into three areas: 1) a broker’s duties to his clients, 2) a broker’s duties to his fellow brokers and 3) a broker’s duties to the public. The current Code of Ethics contains seventeen articles.

Over its one hundred year history, the Code of Ethics has been amended and revised to keep up with the changing times. Local REALTOR® Associations are charged with enforcing the Code of Ethics and handing down punishment to those found to be in violation of one or more of the articles.

To keep REALTORS® up to date on the Code of Ethics, the National Association of REALTORS® requires all REALTORS® to take a training course on the subject every four years.

In recognition and appreciation of their obligations to clients, customers, the public, and each other, REALTORS® continuously strive to become and remain informed on issues affecting real estate and, as knowledgeable professionals, they willingly share the fruit of their experience and study with others.

Source: National Association of REALTORS®

Here’s What One of Our Agents Had to Say

I have worked for Ferguson Realtors for 16 years and they have promoted, supported and help grow my professional career in real estate. Ferguson Realtors is always on the cutting edge of technology with high quality video, photos, websites and creative ideas in advertising to get homes Sold! Their ethics and integrity, that is the Ferguson name, is also unparalleled in the business. Ferguson Realtors has a personable and friendly atmosphere to work in, while being one of the leading Realtors in the industry. Ferguson Realtors is a company that I am proud to say that I hold my license with and plan to continue my career with for years to come.

Are you considering a career in real estate or a company move? If so; check us out at www.topofknox.com.